So you want them to move here?

old barn

Just thirty minutes beyond the bright lights and bustle of Broadway, there’s a whole other side of Nashville that many people never see. It’s a place steeped in local lore and rooted in history, where backroads lead the way  through stories filled fields and a cast of colorful characters. This is a side of Nashville that takes you out of the city and transports you back in time to experience the legacy of rural America, and its connection to everything from the food on our plates to the dye in our jeans. 

Rabbit Circle Tours specializes in custom rural farm tours. The adventure begins with one of our locally born and grown guides picking your VIP up in town. From there, we head off on a tour of the countryside surrounding Nashville with stops in rural communities such as Cross Plains, Springfield, Joelton, Ashland City, Gallatin and Franklin.

Along the way, we will introduce them to locals and grab lunch at one of our favorite locally-owned restaurants. From snacking on sun-ripened tomatoes straight off the vine to a meet-and-greet with favorite farm animals, each tour is unique and customized to the interest of our guests. 

Broadway may boast the highest volume of Nashville tourists, but a Rabbit Circle custom farm tour is the experience that nobody ever forgets. Learn more and book your tour at https://rabbitcircle.com/

There is a lot to see beyond the city limit signs.

Mike, Moo 2 U Dairy

Planning a trip to the southern USA? There a few things that you should know for sure: 

There is a lot to see beyond the city limit signs. The history and culture of the south was created from the dirt and tears of rural farmers. You can’t visit a dirt road, meet a farmer or really know America until you visit the rural countryside. 

Macaroni and cheese is a vegetable. If you are lucky enough to find a locally-owned “meat and 3” restaurant, there will be a long list of side dishes to choose from (and a lot of dirty farm trucks in the parking lot). A meat and 3 restaurant is generally served cafeteria style. You choose your meal from a list of meats and vegetables. one meat, three vegetables, a roll or cornbread and tea. Don’t be confused when you see mac & cheese listed along with all the other sides. In the south, mac and cheese is a vegetable, salads are not.  

The tea will be sweetened black tea with a twist of lemon. Country folks take pride in their sweet tea. It is often so sweet that you can stand a spoon up in the glass. If you order unsweetened tea, it’s a sure giveaway that you aren’t local or you’re on a diet. 

 If you want to meet a real southern farmer, you should be introduced to them by a local at the meat and 3. Farmers are generally shy with foreigners. Foreigners are recognized by the locals as anyone that drinks unsweetened tea, thinks mac and cheese is just a side dish and lives north of Bowling Green, Kentucky. 

Whiskey and moonshine are grown on a farm.  If you visit a distillery, you are only seeing part of the picture. To better understand the cultural significance, you have to visit a cornfield in August.  If you are foreigner traveling in the south, it’s best to visit a farm with a local and bring your own glass. You will likely be invited to sit and sip on a glass of our favorite local beverage. Tea and whisky are the same color, but you’ll have to join us for an afternoon to find out what’s really in our glass. 

Book a farm tour with a local here…  www.RabbitCirlce.com

Christmas from the Farm

The old is new again when it comes to finding the perfect local Christmas gift. If you have ever been one a farm tour with Rabbit Circle you know how proud we are of our farmers. If you have been good, you are likely to find a bottle of wine, a pair of jeans, a hemp flower and cigar under your tree. If you have been naughty, I know where to find a bundle of switches, my Daddy has been pruning his apple trees and there is a fresh stack. 

Cherry Wine form Sumner Crest Winery

Cherry Wine , Sumner Crest Winery

If you have never heard of Orlinda Tennessee, you are missing out. Orlinda is officially the sunniest spot in Tennessee or at least that’s what it says on the city limits sign. Sumner Crest Winey has a wonderfully tart Cherry Wine that will remind you of the bright summer sun.  

Cigars from Avanti 

Avanti Cigars

Robertson Country Tennessee is the dark fired tobacco capital of the world.  The tobacco grown in the black patch region of southern Kentucky and middle Tennessee has long been sought after for its wonderfully smoky aroma. If you have ever been to the region in the fall you are sure to have caught a wif of the smoking barns.   Form me it the smell of home and tradition. 

Jeans dyed with Tennessee Indigo  

Stay Creek Colors

Sarah Bellos from Stony Creek Colors has inspired local farmers to growing something different and wonderful. Indigo is a plant based natural dye that had been in use for centuries. Support our local farms buy purchasing denim dyed with Tennessee grown Indigo 

Hemp Flowers

28 % CBD

Everyone is talking about where to find best the locally grown hemp in Tennessee.  White’s Family Farm grew hemp that contains 28% CBD.  If you are interested in a few flowers or 10,000 lbs give them a call. Its legal for Santa to deliver it across American in a flat rate postage box from USPS. 

Switches from Shade Tree Farm and Orchard

Switches

A family tradition for the naughty kids on your list. A fresh bundle of apple branches from Shade Tree Farm and Orchard.

100 Years- What’s Changed

Newspaper clipping 1930

I found this newspaper clipping while going through my Granny Head’s scrapbook. It dates from about 1930. Pictured is my Great Grandfather Raymond Head and his 4 children.

The caption under the first photos reads: ” A recently-bought flock of Montana ewes on the farm of Raymond Head, near Springfield, is inspected by county Agent Harmon Jones and Mr Heads son Robert. The sheep are expected to play a big part in making up the loss caused by dealing dark fired tobacco market;”

2019 is the first year that there will be an industrial hemp crop in Tennessee. A recent article in the Tennessean reads ” Faced with the decreasing profitability of tobacco and an expanding market of hemp products, some of Tennessee’s longtime tobacco farmers are abandoning the state’s traditional cash crop and embracing a lucrative but largely uncharted hemp industry.”

Another story from Forbes online reads. “How Hemp Is Giving Renewed Life To America’s Tobacco Farmers”

It seems as though there is an ongoing conversation with Black Patch tobacco farmers that’s lasted for well over 100 years. What will be the next big crop that replaces the income from tobacco?

Robertson County has a long proud history

Aunt Fannie Hart

Mary Frances Barbee Was born October 30 1844. She was 73 years, 3 months and 2 days old at the time of her death, February 1, 1918. She was a consistent member of Corinth Church for more than 40 years. 

She was married to N.H. Hart, June 30, 1962. Of this union were born 11 children. Seven sons and 4 daughters, all now living, grown, married, settled members of the church. 

On February 2, a short funeral service was conducted at the home by her pastor, Reverend Whitefield and concluded at the grave in the old Hart graveyard, where she was laid to rest. It was a touching and beautiful sight to watch six of her stalwart sons gently lower the lifeless body of their mother to the grave. She had lived to a good old age and died as she had lived, loved and honored by all who knew her. This is a short history of a good woman that has paid the last debt and gone to her reward. 

I was asked to assist the preacher in the funeral service, but on account of the inclement weather did not get there, so will write about what I should have said, not as an obituary, but as a small tribute to her memory. 

More that 70 years ago when I was not much more than a babe and about the time she was born, my father moved to but a little more than a mile from her father’s home. Here a real and pleasant acquaintance began that has lasted all these years since. She was a great favorite in school, and in fact with all who knew her. 

Nearly 40 years ago I settled as a doctor in sight of her home. Some of her children had grown up and others were unborn. I watched the younger children grow up and attended any of them when sick and for almost all these years was the family physician, a relation, perhaps next the preacher, the most sacred. 

A 3rdof a century ago, when I married her niece, who loved her almost as she loved her own mother, she became to me “Aunt Fannie” and I reverenced her almost as much as much as did my own dear aunts that went to their homes many years ago. There were 3 traits in Aunt Fannie’s character that I wish to mention her as predominating more I think than in any person I have known. They were industry, unselfishness, and appreciation. She always wanted to be doing something, wanted to be at work and to show her unselfishness at work for someone else. 

First, of course, it was her family, her children; next her relations then her neighbors. I wish I could know how many of those have some little piece of her handwork as a keepsake, that they will now appreciate more now that she is gone. It mattered not how small and insignificant the present from her husband, children relatives or neighbors she showed keen appreciation of her countenance. Can you wonder that she loved everybody? Because everybody loved her. All these years I have known her I can call to mind now word about her but in praise. 

She was the youngest daughter of a large family and survived them all except one brother, the youngest child of the family, who though living in a distant state, came often to see sister Fannie whom he adored. 

A good woman has died, and may Heaven’s Blessings rest on those left behind. 

Oak Lawn, Feb 2 1918 H.S.